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Uptide rod advice

Mr Fish

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If I recall from a Cox and Rawle book on boatcasting they stumbled upon the effectiveness of boatcasting and then had to construct the theory. They came to the conclusion that the anchor warp and the boat created a scare zone , particularily in shallow water so more fish were caught by the boatcasters. In my experience the further your bait is from the boat the more bites you get. By the way if you cast straight uptide your bait will settle quite close to the boat , in the scare zone.

Final point is that it can be dangerous if the rig and lead is swung on the deck before casting , I have seen traces and hooks slip off the gripper lead during the cast. Never take your eyes off it when you ( or someone else) are casting.

Oh yes, always cast outside the boat, with the gear held low to the water and then flicked up and out, never comes over the boat.

If people need to do an overhead thump and have it over the boat at any point, then really they need to go away and practice first!
 

glandyman

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Oh yes, always cast outside the boat, with the gear held low to the water and then flicked up and out, never comes over the boat.

If people need to do an overhead thump and have it over the boat at any point, then really they need to go away and practice first!
You have to watch out for the loons on any boat , one guy on our club trip decided on his first uptide effort that he would clip up the bottom rig to the lead , leaving two flappers with flying traces dangling above everyone else. Another time I ducked when the guy opposite me shouted " casting" and then felt his hook trace around my neck, as it dislodged from his lead. I haven't screamed so much since I starred in Deliverance. His response to my left hook was that he did shout!!
 

Warby72

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You have to watch out for the loons on any boat , one guy on our club trip decided on his first uptide effort that he would clip up the bottom rig to the lead , leaving two flappers with flying traces dangling above everyone else. Another time I ducked when the guy opposite me shouted " casting" and then felt his hook trace around my neck, as it dislodged from his lead. I haven't screamed so much since I starred in Deliverance. His response to my left hook was that he did shout!!
I would have flung the prick overboard.
 

Craig

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A few things I've discovered from my uptiding efforts.....
The casting should always be done outside of the boat if possible and as others have said, if that's not possible, practice first before going. It's just a good underarm cast that's required and with a half decent rod, it's surprising what distance you can achieve.
Clipping the bait on a grip wire for casting helps reduce tangles and reduces the risk of your bait flapping about during the cast, also means that your bait should stay on the hook better.
I've always found that the further forward you are on the boat, the easier it is uptiding, mainly because the lead seems to anchor better, though you have to be alot more on the ball when you catch a decent fish as there's usually a good few rods behind you which you could get tangles with.
Depending on tidal flow and depth, you may get away with a rod you already have.... I fish out of West mersea in Essex, which is fairly shallow with not a massive tide, I get away with 6oz most of the time (need to try 4oz grips really) and 8 Oz when the rides really running. My go to rods are a sonik sk3 uptide and a Penn 20-50g spinning rod, both work well but the spinning rod does struggle with the rays abit, surprisingly enough. I also have a sonik sk3 boat rod which works perfectly fine for uptiding too. The main thing is that the rod needs a supple tip, anything too stiff with trip the lead out. One thing to note regarding rods, we usually have 8 on the boat fishing two rods each, my uptide rod is the only uptide rod on the boat, we very rarely have a lead trip out from anyone's rod, so your boat rod will probably do the job just fine for the time being.
I've always used a running ledger, never found much need for anything else when uptiding, but others do use other rigs, can't say the catch rate is different between various rigs.
 

Mr Fish

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A few things I've discovered from my uptiding efforts.....
The casting should always be done outside of the boat if possible and as others have said, if that's not possible, practice first before going. It's just a good underarm cast that's required and with a half decent rod, it's surprising what distance you can achieve.
Clipping the bait on a grip wire for casting helps reduce tangles and reduces the risk of your bait flapping about during the cast, also means that your bait should stay on the hook better.
I've always found that the further forward you are on the boat, the easier it is uptiding, mainly because the lead seems to anchor better, though you have to be alot more on the ball when you catch a decent fish as there's usually a good few rods behind you which you could get tangles with.
Depending on tidal flow and depth, you may get away with a rod you already have.... I fish out of West mersea in Essex, which is fairly shallow with not a massive tide, I get away with 6oz most of the time (need to try 4oz grips really) and 8 Oz when the rides really running. My go to rods are a sonik sk3 uptide and a Penn 20-50g spinning rod, both work well but the spinning rod does struggle with the rays abit, surprisingly enough. I also have a sonik sk3 boat rod which works perfectly fine for uptiding too. The main thing is that the rod needs a supple tip, anything too stiff with trip the lead out. One thing to note regarding rods, we usually have 8 on the boat fishing two rods each, my uptide rod is the only uptide rod on the boat, we very rarely have a lead trip out from anyone's rod, so your boat rod will probably do the job just fine for the time being.
I've always used a running ledger, never found much need for anything else when uptiding, but others do use other rigs, can't say the catch rate is different between various rigs.
Agree with all that! I think I’ll pass on a spinning rod in the BC though 😂
 

Topwater

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Need 10oz long wired leads with braid on the Mersey. Conoflex Demon 2 or Daiwa TDU for me, but I know plenty that have cut down suitable beachcasters to 10ft ish
 
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